6-on-6 Artist Interview :: Candi Qianwen Jiang

Untitled 16. Digital print. 2014.

Where were you born?
I was born on December 15, 1988 in Dalian, China.

What is your major at AAU?
I’m currently working on my master’s degree in Photography. I have a year and a half to finish.

How would you describe your work to someone?
Photography allows me to create the world in my mind and sharing the images and results of my imagination is such an exciting process. In my photographs, I pretend there is no gravity. Buildings can lean in strange directions or upside down, and sometimes they can even float. I’m very interested in architecture and geometric photography. When I look at a building, I like to feel the personality of it by photographing it in a way that I can restructure it in my mind. What I find attractive are the geometric shapes and patterns of the building, within the interior and exterior. The unique decorations on the surface, different textures from the various materials the building is composed of, and all of its ornate details appeal to me. I hope to make a strong impact on the viewer with my photographs.

Who or what influences your work?
One of my favorite photographers is Hélène Binet, who is a Swiss-French architectural photographer. I get a lot of inspiration from her photographs and books.

What is your process for creating work and what materials do you prefer?
I like to observe the world and capture images through my own lens, which is then filtered by my background in graphic design. I’m very fond of patterns and lines in my day-to-day life, and I’m always visualizing where I can place line and space in my own photographs. When I’m brainstorming, I usually sketch out my ideas on paper. My sketches will contain anything from the composition and shape of the main focal point or the ornate details of a window. Alongside these sketches, I write some brief descriptions and then try to photograph these ideas in the real world. While shooting, I like to use different lighting elements such as indoor lighting in a studio or natural outdoor lighting. My final step in my process is doing some post editing in Photoshop to help me create the image.

What is next? Upcoming exhibitions, trips, graduation, etc.
I plan on traveling to different countries and destinations so I can photograph the local architecture and landscape. My main goal is to photograph different kinds of architecture.  Also, I’m planning a solo and group exhibition sometime before I graduate.

The 6-on-6 Artist Interview series consists of 6 questions for student artists asked by the Library staff on the 6th floor.

Candi Qianwen Jiang’s interview was conducted by Ellen Dario, Library Supervisor, in August 2014.

Coming Soon! Fall 2014 Student Art Exhibition!

COMING SOON!

The AAU Library is pleased to announce that our Fall 2014 exhibition will showcase a series of black-and-white photographs by MFA Photography student Candi Qianwen Jiang.

Stay tuned for interviews with the artist, images of her work, and recommended resources!

Call for Submissions: Fall 2014 Exhibition

Art @ AAU Library is now accepting submissions for the Fall 2014 semester exhibition. Current AAU students from all departments are invited to apply.

Interested students should include the following information in an email with the subject line “ART @ AAU LIBRARY SUBMISSION” to adansiger@academyart.edu:

  • Full name
  • AAU student ID number
  • Department and expected graduation date
  • Phone number
  • Email address
  • Digital images of 5-10 finished pieces
  • Brief descriptions of work including title, size, medium, and year
  • Brief artist statement (1-2 paragraphs)

The deadline for all submissions is July 4, 2014.

Do not bring any artwork to the Library until requested!

Last Two Weeks of Spring 2014 Exhibition!

Need a break from finals? Take a moment to view the artwork by your fellow students on display for two more weeks in the library!

If you can’t make it over to the library, images of all the pieces on display (as well as all artwork from past exhibitions) can be viewed on our Flickr page here.

The call for submissions for our next exhibition in the Fall 2014 semester is coming soon!

6-on-6 Artist Interview :: Shahin Fathi Djalali

Pride. Digital. 2013.

Where were you born?

I was born in Tehran, Iran on March 12th, 1982.

What is your major at AAU?

I’m majoring in 3D animation (modeling) in MFA program. I also take some of the visual development classes.

How would you describe your work to someone?

It depends on each work. For example if I do fine art, like the works exhibited here, my tendency is to raise questions instead of answering any. In other words, it’s up to the viewers and their points of view to create different perceptions of the same work. In contrast, when I create artwork for production (animation, movies, games, etc.), I have a completely different process and goal. In production, you need to be as clear about your subject matter as possible since the viewer has limited time to process it.

Who or what influences your work?

Pretty much everything! Mostly nature and what I can find in it. Since my works vary in style and medium (from cartoony to realistic and from traditional painting to digital sculpting), things that influence them are also so vast and various. Whatever project I start I try to get as many references possible as I can. Usually these references are raw images from nature or the environment around me. I also refer to similar works done by other artists for inspiration or for solving particular problems in my own work.

What is your process for creating work and what materials do you prefer?

Each project has a different process, I learned that in my previous major as an industrial designer, but there is always a lot of planning in the beginning of the project. I personally prefer digital medium not because it is easier to work with (which is a false common belief by the way) but because I prefer to have the most control over my works whether it will be an image, a video, or a sculpture. Working with digital medium gives me the ability of having this amount of control because of its nonlinear nature when compared to traditional methods. For example, you can go back and forth between major composition elements and fine details and change each of them drastically without losing the other aspect, something that is almost impossible in traditional methods.

What is next? (upcoming exhibitions, trips, graduation, new projects, etc.)

Currently I’m working on my thesis here at AAU, and I’ll be here for at least one more year to fill in the gaps between the knowledge I have in CGI. I hope I can find a proper internship and job in the media industry (especially the animation area) in the near future.

The 6-on-6 Artist Interview series consists of 6 questions for student artists asked by the Library staff on the 6th floor.

Shahin Fathi Djalali’s interview was conducted by Lindsey Simard, Information Literacy Librarian, in January 2014.

6-on-6 Artist Interview :: Anne Chia Ching Lin

Community Library, Under the Wing. Autodesk Revit, Autodesk 3ds Max, Adobe Photoshop. 2013.

Where were you born?

New Jersey but I was raised in Taiwan.

What is your major at AAU?

MFA of Interior Architecture & Design.

How would you describe your work to someone?

A good design is not just visually beautiful but it echoes the essence of one’s individual personality. Using “healing interior” as my principle for design, I try to build up the spatial relationship and interaction with each individual. Design is a gift, bringing heavenly inspiration to Earth for human enjoyment.

Who or what influences your work?

My parents have taught me, “Love cannot be seen or measured.“ Most people have drawn or made cards for their parents while little, so did I and I still do. I remember the first time I tried to save my allowance to buy flowers for Mother’s Day. My mom was happy but then told me not to buy them again. “Flowers will faint but your lovely card won’t.” I have made a card by hand every single year for my parents since then. This experience has also affected my way of approaching design. Each project is unique and customized for each individual, just like a handmade gift for the client, which touches the heart most.

What is your process for creating work and what materials do you prefer?

Understanding the client, the site environment and the culture history. It is a thought process that includes people, profit and planet. While interviewing and researching, I will start getting the feel of the project. I prefer to hand sketch the most memorable scene and think through people’s experience and movement in the space.

What is next? Upcoming exhibitions, trips, graduation, etc.

I am going to graduate this year in Summer 2014. Currently I have an internship with Brayton Hughes Design Studio, which provides comprehensive commercial, institutional and high-end residential design. Their clients include the Four Seasons and Ritz-Carlton Hotel, both leaders of hospitality design. I am also doing a retreat center for my thesis project. It will be a great experience not only for my future job search, but understanding and applying design for relaxation and dwelling units will help fulfill my passion for healing interiors.

The 6-on-6 Artist Interview series consists of 6 questions for student artists asked by the Library staff on the 6th floor.

Anne Chia Ching Lin’s interview was conducted by Abby Dansiger, Visual Resources Librarian & Special Collections Manager, in January 2014.

6-on-6 Artist Interview :: Marisa Ware

Seasons. Cut paper. 2013.

Where were you born?

I was born and raised in Boulder, Colorado where I garnered my deep appreciation of nature from a childhood spent enveloped in the forests and glades of the Rocky Mountains. The formative experiences I had in the dense woods and sun-dappled meadows of these mountains heavily influenced both my paradigm and my visual interpretation of the world. This connectivity helped me develop an acute awareness of detail. The fluorescent dabs of chartreuse lichen on cold, grey granite, or the delicate follicles of soft downy hair on the unfurling frond of a fern delighted my eyes and taught me about beauty. It was in nature that I learned about art, through the symmetry of a butterfly’s wing or the iridescent greens and reds of a ruby throated hummingbird’s tiny feathers.

When the tides of my life pulled me away from the Colorado mountains I so loved and placed me into the chaotic cacophony of a California city, I began to understand that the experiences I had as a child were uncommon to many who didn’t have the fortune to grow up amongst the trees. Reflecting on this, I began to understand my purpose as an artist. I feel that is my role to visually depict the sacredness of the human experience, especially as manifested in nature, so that others may connect to this powerful source of abundant primordial magic. In my art I strive to provide a window into the sacredness of the ordinary world and the latent spiritual potential of every human individual.

What is your major at AAU?

I’m working towards a master’s degree in Traditional Illustration. I also have a bachelor’s degree from the University of Colorado in Editorial Journalism and have written for a wide array of publications, including Juxtapoz, Hi-Fructose, Climbing Magazine, and Elephant Journal.

How would you describe your work to someone?

I strive to capture the organic framework that makes up the world we live in, the underlying patterns that become visible in elevated states of consciousness. While my work is constantly evolving, at the moment I have two very distinct styles I’m working with. Both styles are very design-based with a graphic sensibility. One style uses cut paper and is more geared towards children’s books, while the other style is predominately pen and ink with intricate detail and allegorical content. I like to explore the design potentials created with dynamic symmetry while using imagery borrowed from nature- flowers, birds, fish, animals, trees, etc.

Who or what influences your work?

Although I find inspiration in thousands of places, nothing influences my work or my perception of the world as much as my daily meditation practice. I’ve been studying Tibetan Buddhism for a little over a decade and have attended numerous meditation courses including a month long retreat. Nothing focuses and cleanses my perceptions as powerfully as meditation does. It’s like wiping the dust off of a pair of glasses- suddenly you notice the small beauties and intricacies all around you. I also find that meditation greatly heightens my creative powers, as well as my ability to concentrate.

As far as other artists go, I find inspiration from artists of the past such as William-Adolphe Bourguereau, John Singer Sargent, and John William Waterhouse. I’ve always been inspired by Frida Kahlo and Georgia O Keefe, not only for their art, but also for their boldness as female artists and fearlessness with which they lived their lives. I’ve been very influenced by Alphonse Mucha’s design sense and am a fan of Maxfield Parish and J.C. Lyendecker. Contemporary artists that I admire include John Baizley, David Hale, Nicomi Turner, Josh Keyes, James Jean, Jeremy Mann, Nikki McClure, Emily Hogarth, Nimit Malavia, Sylvia Ji, Tiffany Bozic and Joao Ruas.

I find a lot of inspiration in literature and poetry, as well as in music. I am also inspired by strong emotions, whether it be sorrow or joy, happiness or loss, love or grief; I find they provide potent creative fuel. My ultimate muse is found in nature- in redwood forests, granite mountaintops, desolate deserts, or the vastness of the sea.

What is your process for creating work and what materials do you prefer?

My process begins first with inspiration, which comes sometimes as vague and fleeting images that flash before my open eyes. I attempt to capture these with quick and messy sketches that would be intelligible to anyone else. The next step is generally collecting reference photos, which can sometimes be the most time-consuming part of my process. For my pen and ink drawings, I’ll often use Photoshop to test out compositions before starting a pencil drawing, which I’ll eventually ink. Recently, I’ve started scanning my finished pen drawings into Photoshop to color them.

My cut paper illustrations come much more organically to me, and I often just draw the designs straight from my head without reference. The process of cutting the paper, then assembling and gluing the layers is extremely tedious and time-consuming though.

What is next? Upcoming exhibitions, trips, graduation, etc.

I’m planning on graduating in December of this year. Between now and then I have several commissions I’m working on, including a few album covers and concert posters. I typically spend every break from school traveling, rock climbing, and being out in nature as much as possible.

The 6-on-6 Artist Interview series consists of 6 questions for student artists asked by the Library staff on the 6th floor.

Marisa Ware’s interview was conducted by Audrey Ferrie, Library Director, in January 2014.

Spring 2014 Exhibition Is Here!

National Archives UK. Great Hartford Show, Hatfield. Ringmaster announcing next event. ca. 1926-42. Flickr. Yahoo! Inc. 20 Jan. 2014.

NEW ARTWORK NOW ON VIEW!

The AAU Library is pleased to announce that our Spring 2014 exhibition is up! This semester we are showcasing artwork by Shahin Fathi Djalali, Anne Chia Ching Lin, and Marisa Ware.

Stay tuned for interviews with each artist, images of their work, and their recommended resources!

Call for Submissions: Spring 2014 Exhibition

U.S. National Archives. “Getting em up” at U.S. Naval Training Camp, Seattle, Washington. Webster & Stevens, ca. 1917–1918. Flickr. Yahoo! Inc. 22 Oct. 2013.

Art @ AAU Library is now accepting submissions for the Spring 2014 semester exhibition. Current AAU students from all departments are invited to apply.

Interested students should include the following information in an email with the subject line “ART @ AAU LIBRARY SUBMISSION” to adansiger@academyart.edu:

  • Full name
  • AAU student ID number
  • Department and expected graduation date
  • Phone number
  • Email address
  • Digital images of 5-10 finished pieces
  • Brief descriptions of work including title, size, and medium
  • Brief artist statement (1-2 paragraphs)

The deadline for all submissions is November 22, 2013.

Do not bring any artwork to the Library until requested!

Opening Reception This Friday!

All AAU students, staff, faculty and alumni are invited to join us for refreshments and celebrate the opening of Art @ AAU Library’s Fall 2013 student exhibition featuring Spencer Chopp, Sarah Ortiz, Quynh Phan, and Lisa Taylor.

Where: AAU Library, 180 New Montgomery, 6th Floor
When: Friday, September 20th from 5:00-6:00 PM

Also be sure to check out our interviews with each artist, images of their artwork and their recommended resources, all available on this blog!

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